My Tools and Process for Writing

Every writer has his or her own process and tools. Some write in isolation, others in crowded places. Some are all digital and others only turn to a computer when everything is outlined and ready to roll. I enjoy learning how other writers go about their craft. It can spark some new ideas or teach me something to help me as a writer. What follows is my process with the tools I use. I don’t mean the creative and intellectual process. I mean the actual machination of creating a written piece.

1) Evernote

Evernote is where I collect ideas. It’s a file cabinet for writing ingredients and half baked ideas. It links with e-readers and web browsers so quotes and links are super easy to save. The immediate sync between mobile app and computer makes it incredibly smooth. to use. When find an idea, have a thought (yes, I occasionally have them), see a link or quote I can save it in just a few seconds and revisit later when I need writing ideas.

2) Moleskine

412BDDrm8aL

I love Moleskine notebooks. Why these slightly more expensive ones instead of any old bound notebook? I could argue their quality (they are much nicer than others), but really it’s all psychological. Just as an Apple computer makes users feel creative and forward thinking and a nice suit is dressing for success so a Moleskine makes users feel like a writer. To me that matters.

I outline every piece I write by hand before writing. Sometimes this is just a few bullet points (like this post), but I do the same for every section of every chapter in my books too. Sometimes I write out full sentences or phrases I want to incorporate later and other times it’s just key words or subject lines to build the thought process. Outlining by hand slows my mind down and allows me to connect ideas I might otherwise have missed. For me typing feels more mechanical, a means to spit out a finished product. Hand writing allows creativity and imagination to lead the way in building an idea, like an architect dreaming up a new building.

3) Pilot Uniball Vision Elite Pen

Screen Shot 2015-04-25 at 4.12.07 PM

If you’re going to use a particular notebook you must also use a particular writing utensil (Sort of an unwritten rule, you know?). I abhor pencils and get annoyed at cheap junk pens. (Ball point pens are torture devices.) I can’t use fountain pens and even if I could I think I’d find them to be a nuisance. But this, this is my favorite pen. It writes clearly without smearing or pooling. It is smooth, and it’s not insanely expensive. I use them for all writing projects and for work.

4) Coffee

183416101512537308145151325210029n_1313_75_f

Yes, it’s an addiction. No, I feel no shame about it. In reality, though, as someone with a full time job and a family I end up doing much of my writing in the evenings after my kids are in bed and I need a mental kick even to just get a couple of productive hours in before falling asleep. And as every parent knows, we’re always tired, so to write well at any time of day means we need a pick-me-up. Plus it’s delicious and sanctifying and a good gift from God. Drink up.

5) Computer

After collecting my ideas, outlining them to whatever level is necessary, then I type it up. This process varies from piece to piece. Sometimes the outline almost is the article. Other times it is jut a few mile markers with lots of space between for me to fill in. This is the prose and craft part of the job. If Evernote is the storage warehouse and my Moleskine holds the blueprint, foundation, and frame this is the rest of construction from putting up walls to interior decorating. By the time I sit down to do this I want to know what I am building and, at least generally, how I will do so. What it looks and feels like in the process? Well, that is the fun of writing.